Friday, November 16, 2012

Scaffolding

The House of Hope Church on Summit Avenue is undergoing massive maintenance. I walked by there and marveled at the amount of scaffolding necessary to do the work, not to mention the massive crane stationed there to aid in the work. House of Hope is the Presbyterian Church where the funeral of Hubert Humphrey was held in January of 1978. That event brought a whole lot of famous and powerful politicians to Minnesota, and I remember going over there on a really cold day to try to get some photos of the attendees. Without success. It was too cold for anyone but the masses to be outside, I guess.

The church hasn't changed much since that day, except they took down the security fences and sent the Secret Service home.


I walked by there with no one much noticing.

I spent a couple of hours today at the Tennis Center at Fort Snelling. There was some sort of workshop going on for tennis teachers, so we were shuttled to the back courts where we (the gang of geezers) managed to finish three full sets of pretty good for old guys tennis. Now I'm knackered. But the tennis was hondaramic.

That's all I have for today.

4 comments:

Emily Miller said...

En français: l'échafaudage. One of my favorite and most useful French vocab words.

Il y a de l'échafaudage partout!

Retired Professor said...

There is scaffolding everywhere?

House of Hope is a great name for a church.



Professor B said...

Coincidentally, scaffolding was the Word of the Week in my literacy class. ESL teachers are taught instructional scaffolding as a teaching method and the term is catching on with content area teachers. This meaning of scaffolding has not yet made the dictionaries but can be found on Wikipedia.

Jimi said...

I'd like a little more explanation of instructional scaffolding (50 words or less).